keondillon:

Photo Cred: Grae.

keondillon:

Photo Cred: Grae.

"Magic is not so much something which you do occasionally behind closed doors or in the space behind your closed eyes, but a way of living your life — a way of approaching the world you move through and everything in it."

Phil Hine, Condensed Chaos
afrodiaspores:

yearningforunity:

Gullah
South Carolina

Alas, kinship isn’t identity—and for some reason, this image has been going around as representing Geechee/Gullah culture in South Carolina and Georgia for a while. Maybe it’s because the photograph was included in an exhibition on Lorenzo Dow Turner, whose research spanned both Sea Island and Bahian culture.
But the photo is actually the famous Brazilian Candomblé priestess Mãe Menininha (1894-1986)—in the front-middle—and her attendants at Ilé Axé Yá Masse temple, in Salvador, Bahia, 1940-41. (It appeared on Tumblr with the correct attribution here three years ago; I’ve reblogged it myself.) Let’s take a minute to appreciate the reality:


The temple that Mãe Menininha headed, the Terreiro do Gantois, is one of the oldest and most respected Candomblé temples in Bahia and is recognized as one of the more orthodox or traditionally African Candomblé centers. The Terreiro do Gantois was actually founded after Mãe Pulquéria diverged from an older temple, Engenho Velho, thought to be one of the oldest Candomblé temples in Bahia. Founded by three freed African women, Engenho Velho traces its history back at least to the 1830s and perhaps even one hundred years earlier…
Mãe Menininha dedicated her life to Candomblé during a time when African religions were still repressed in Brazil. She suffered imprisonment and violent persecution by the police due to her involvement with Candomblé. Her resistance to these discriminatory governmental policies against Afro- Brazilian religious practices was essential for the survival of Candomblé as an important part of Brazilian culture…

afrodiaspores:

yearningforunity:

Gullah

South Carolina

Alas, kinship isn’t identity—and for some reason, this image has been going around as representing Geechee/Gullah culture in South Carolina and Georgia for a while. Maybe it’s because the photograph was included in an exhibition on Lorenzo Dow Turner, whose research spanned both Sea Island and Bahian culture.

But the photo is actually the famous Brazilian Candomblé priestess Mãe Menininha (1894-1986)—in the front-middle—and her attendants at Ilé Axé Yá Masse temple, in Salvador, Bahia, 1940-41. (It appeared on Tumblr with the correct attribution here three years ago; I’ve reblogged it myself.) Let’s take a minute to appreciate the reality:

The temple that Mãe Menininha headed, the Terreiro do Gantois, is one of the oldest and most respected Candomblé temples in Bahia and is recognized as one of the more orthodox or traditionally African Candomblé centers. The Terreiro do Gantois was actually founded after Mãe Pulquéria diverged from an older temple, Engenho Velho, thought to be one of the oldest Candomblé temples in Bahia. Founded by three freed African women, Engenho Velho traces its history back at least to the 1830s and perhaps even one hundred years earlier…

Mãe Menininha dedicated her life to Candomblé during a time when African religions were still repressed in Brazil. She suffered imprisonment and violent persecution by the police due to her involvement with Candomblé. Her resistance to these discriminatory governmental policies against Afro- Brazilian religious practices was essential for the survival of Candomblé as an important part of Brazilian culture…

"Life is available only in the present moment."

Thich Nhat Hanh  

"You are only free when you realize you belong no place—you belong every place—no place at all. The price is high, the reward is great."

Maya Angelou 

"Magic is neither good nor evil. It is a tool, like a knife. Is a knife evil? Only if the wielder is evil,"

living in the past and the future simultaneously

nyantolo:

loveonceuponapoet:

dear halie, bring rest. bring something sharp & wondrous for this neglected faith. bring a child. bring gold, twilight, a quilt to cover the coffin. bring sanity. bring a war cry that fits my mouth. bring everything lost that belongs to me. bring tomorrow. bring a moment good enough to keep.

Ase’!

nyantolo:

loveonceuponapoet:

dear halie, bring rest. bring something sharp & wondrous for this neglected faith. bring a child. bring gold, twilight, a quilt to cover the coffin. bring sanity. bring a war cry that fits my mouth. bring everything lost that belongs to me. bring tomorrow. bring a moment good enough to keep.

Ase’!

transparentoctopus:

Paul Klee, water pyramids 1924

transparentoctopus:

Paul Klee, water pyramids 1924

ratak-monodosico:

Fauconnet, Le Sol, 1918

ratak-monodosico:

Fauconnet, Le Sol, 1918

Psychic stimulation tea

the-darkest-of-lights:

1 tbsp mugwort
1 tsp lemon balm
1 tsp peppermint
1 tsp yarrow
1/4 tsp cinnamon

Grind the ingredients together and place in a tea pot. Allow them to brew for 10 minutes and strain and drink.

_Judika Illes

deimos66:

Mysterium by leoplaw

deimos66:

Mysterium by leoplaw

Luisah Teish — “Superconsciousness” 

odofemi:

Oñí pa´ OchúnJavier Gonzalez Gallosa (Cienfuegos, Cuba),Acrylic on canvas(27 1/2” x 35 1/2”), 2005

odofemi:

Oñí pa´ Ochún
Javier Gonzalez Gallosa (Cienfuegos, Cuba),
Acrylic on canvas
(27 1/2” x 35 1/2”), 2005

hijo-de-chango:

Rooster - Manuel Mendive

hijo-de-chango:

Rooster - Manuel Mendive